Ponit and Monet, what’s the difference?

  • Ponit and Monet, what’s the difference?

     Brendan Andrews updated 2 months, 2 weeks ago 1 Member · 2 Posts
  • Brendan Andrews

    Member
    July 12, 2022 at 1:19 pm

    Dwani (see how I used the vocative there, if your name was Dwanius 🙂 , I have a question about verb endings. I know that when you say, “monet,” it means, “he warns,” because of the “t” ending. Same thing with “ponit” meaning “he puts.” The thing I don’t really understand is why, since both verbs in their original states of ponere and monere have different verb endings. Ponit drops the “e” from the “ere” and replaces it with an “i” and then adds the “t.” Monere on the other hand keeps the “e” from “ere” and adds the “t.” Is there any sort of Latin law that allows you to know when a verb is like ponere or monere, so you know to change the ending accordingly? Also, when the word has an “ire” ending like “exire” you drop the “ire” and add “eunt” to say “they leave,” right? For “ere” verbs like “dividere” you drop the “ere” and add “iunt” to say “they divide,” right? Thanks.

  • Brendan Andrews

    Member
    July 12, 2022 at 2:14 pm

    It’s because ponere and similar verbs like dicere, are third conjugation verbs, right? I literally just turned the page of the book and watched the videos for Lesson 26.

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